A phenomenological approach to skeptical theism

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The evidential argument from evil

At least one way of formulating the evidential argument from evil is as follows:

What appears? A phenomenological approach

Phenomenological reflection reveals that the appearance of the world is always mediated by two factors: the lived body and the thought-life. For example: a person appears blurry, not because he or she is blurry, but because one has bad eyesight (lived body). Another example: a person who learns that he or she has been adopted would experience his or her parents differently, not because of a change in them, nor because of a change in the lived body, but because of a change with respect to how he or she understands his or her parents (thought-life).

Can evil events appear to be gratuitous?

The lived body and the thought-life make the world accessible to consciousness but also hide things. With respect to evils in the world, it is precisely the lived body and the thought-life that make it impossible to judge that they are gratuitous.

The apparent gratuity of evil reconsidered

For this reason, the inference in the evidential argument from evil fails. It fails because the gratuity of an evil is not something which can appear to us — once it is understood what this purported gratuity would actually consist in.

I have a PhD in Theology from Fuller Theological Seminary.

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